Uganda Cranes’ defender Henry Kalungi has donated once again, this time to families in Katanga slum, a settlement located in the valley between Mulago Hospital and Makerere University, in Uganda‘s capital city, Kampala.

Henry Kalungi donating food in Katanga slum this morning with Jacqueline Kalungi,Rich Posipanko,Susan Gunderson,Tom Gunderson

Posted by Ivan Kakembo on Saturday, January 14, 2017

The Charlotte Independence star carried with him supplies like cooking oil and other food stuffs on Saturday – meant for families that barely find a living in the poorly drained and poverty-ravaged area.

Kalungi – who was voted best defensive player of the year at United Soccer League club Charlotte Independence – feels he can make a difference in the lives of other people thanks to blessings he has realized from his talent.

“God has blessed us with so much and there is need to look back where we come from and help others,” he told Kawowo Sports.

Henry Kalungi carrying food stuffs for people living in Katanga slum Courtesy

“Through the Henry Kalungi foundation and the entire family,we want to make a difference.We want to change other people’s lives in Uganda and other places we can reach.”

 

“We feel Yes we can change the kids lives but what about the families they come from? So that’s why today we went to provide food to families in the Katanga slums.

“Hopefully we can keep changing lives of people. Hopefully other people can come out and we change lives together. God gives us talents so we can make a difference in this world.”

I want to thank my family and friends through the Henry Kalungi Foundation that helped organize and work tirelessly to…

Posted by Henry Kalungi on Saturday, January 14, 2017

It was the second time Henry Kalungi was donating to the underprivileged, his first coming through two weeks ago.

Kalungi took to Buganda Road playground where he gave football related equipment such as jerseys and boots before treating slum children to a sumptuous ‘Christmas lunch’.

A glance at Katanga Slum

From a distance, the view of the slum is generally a mixture of rust and torn iron sheet roofs alongside mud wattle and papyrus-roofed structures.

On a good day, residents calculate steps between the shacks and the sewage as a stench of fresh human faeces lingers in the air to remind you that you are definitely in Katanga.

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